Traumatic Genital Injury

Posted: July 8, 2012 in Uncategorized
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The Department of Veterans' Affairs have announced that they will pay $50,000 to victims of traumatic genitourinary damage sustained during service in the military. This type of injury has never been so common. Historically, rates of traumatic genital injury — major damage to the penis, testicles, vulva or ovaries — has ranged from 2 to 5%. In 2010, that rate stood at 12.7% of all wounded. Warfare tactics have changed. The widespread presence of concealed Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) has led to catastrophic injury from the waist down being the norm, not the exception. The devices — often implanted in the ground and designed to explode upward — cause damage in a manner which conventional military body armor, designed to protect the torso, is incapable of mitigating. The result is a massive upswing in traumatic injuries to lower limbs and genitalia — injuries which are survivable, but so hard to live with. The psychological impact of these injuries is difficult to overstate. These are soldiers who, ten years ago, would have died from the wounds. Now they have to live with them. Despite how common this injury is, these veterans don't even have a support group. Other combat-induced disabilities such as blindness or loss of limb have always been pervasive. This one is new. Now, the Traumatic Servicemember's Group Life Insurance (TSGLI) has responded to the new wounded by creating a new class of injuries covered in the program. Genital injury will receive similar compensation to limb loss: $50,000. The new policy applies to both male and female servicemembers, and is also retroactive to 2001. The Department of Defense has also tried to respond to the new threats from below by developing new body armor, called ballistic boxers or "combat diapers", designed to armor the vulnerable groin region. [Source: Business Insider | Military & Defense Walter Hickey article 5 Jun 2012 ++]

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